Manchester Community Response

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Manchester Community Response aims to provide short term community based support to prevent admission and allow timely and safe discharge from hospital.


The Manchester Community Response (MCR) service aims to help prevent patients from staying in hospital unnecessarily by providing highly skilled crisis care in the community.

A team of advanced practitioners, social care and a range of health services provide urgent assessments and interventions for people who have a health or social care crisis. MCR supports people to remain at home while the crisis situation is addressed. MCR care will be provided for up to 72 hours, after that, we can refer to appropriate services and support as needed.

The service is part of the wider umbrella of services that we call Manchester Community Response that aim to provide short term community based support to prevent admission and allow timely and safe discharge from hospital.

What is Manchester Community Response?




This service is citywide. It is based on the model provided successfully in North Manchester (previously known as CASS). Over November/December 2018 we began the city-wide roll-out of the model in Central and South Manchester.

Central Manchester: North West Ambulance Service paramedics can now call the crisis team to support someone who would benefit from up to 72 hours of intensive support more than being admitted to hospital.

South Manchester: referrals to the crisis team can now be sent from community health, primary care and the A&E/Clinical Decisions Unit/Acute Medical Unit at Wythenshawe Hospital, to prevent avoidable admissions.

Where is the service available?


The North West Ambulance Service referrals scheme and community health, primary care and acute care referrals scheme will be expanded to cover each area over the coming months, once further recruitment is completed.

What are the milestones?


Previously, paramedics would have had no choice but to take the patient to A&E where they would likely need to be admitted to hospital. In its first month of operation, 32 patients have been cared for at home rather than needing to go to A&E which is a great start.

What has its impact been so far?